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News

June 1, 2017 June 2017: Muon g-2 collaboration featured in MSU Today article

The Muon g−2 Experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL, or "Fermilab") and its members within the MSU Department of Physics and Astronomy, Prof. Martin Berz, Research Prof. Kyoko Makino, and their team of graduate students, are featured in the June 8th MSU Today article "Muon Magnet's Moment Has Arrived".

May 1, 2017 May 2017: Witek Nazarewicz receives Flerov Prize

Hannah Professor of Physics Witold "Witek" Nazarewiczhas been awarded the G. N. Flerov Prize by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia, for his theoretical studies of the atomic and nuclear properties of the heaviest elements.

April 2, 2017 April 2017: Joey Huston named MSU Foundation Professor

In an investiture ceremony held in room 1415 BPS Building on 20 April 2017, Physics & Astronomy Professor Joey Huston was honored as an MSU Foundation Professor.

April 1, 2017 April 2017: Physics and Astronomy Day at Impression 5 Science Center

On Saturday, 15 April 2017, the MSU Department of Physics & Astronomy will be a sponsor of Physics and Astronomy Day at Impression 5 Science Center in Lansing from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. Students and faculty will lead hands-on interactive activities for children of all ages.

March 1, 2017 March 2017: MSU Nuclear Physics graduate program retains #1 national ranking in latest report

MSU’s nuclear physics graduate program, part of the College of Natural Science’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, is among seven MSU graduate programs that rank No. 1 nationally in the latest U.S. News & World Report rankings.

June 3, 2016 June 2016: NSCL researchers find constraints on elusive nuclear reaction rates

The origin of the elements in the Universe is one of the big unsolved questions in science. Nuclear fusion reactions in stars are responsible for creating most of the light elements up to iron. Heavier elements are produced in a network of nuclear reactions and decays, mainly involving the capture of neutrons by unstable nuclei that only exist for fractions of a second. Therefore, it is essentially impossible to measure the majority of these rates directly in the laboratory because the unstable nuclei involved cannot be made into targets for irradiation with neutrons.

June 2, 2016 June 2016: MSU Physics-Astronomy alumnus receives Woodrow Wilson New Jersey Teaching Fellowship

The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation announced on Wednesday, 15 June&2016 the selection of 62 WW New Jersey Teaching Fellows for 2016. Among them is Michigan State University alumnus (M.S. 2016) Walter Buhro. The new Fellows were introduced at an event today with Governor Chris Christie.

The highly competitive program recruits both recent graduates and career changers with strong backgrounds in science, technology, engineering, and math – the STEM fields – and prepares them specifically to teach in high-need secondary schools.

June 1, 2016 June 2016: Evidence found supporting MSU astronomers' theoretical model

In earlier research, described here, MSU Physics & Astronomy Professors Mark Voit and Megan Donahue, along with other astrophysicists from other institutions, presented an explanation of the differing rates of star formation in different galaxy clusters which used analogies to rain formation in our own planet's atmosphere.